Ideas to innovate Products Process Services

About

The Care Innovation Station portal, a collaboration between the Nursing Innovation Council and the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, is now open to accept your ideas. We are looking for ideas to innovate new products, processes, and services from all hospital staff, patients, families and caregivers.
What is the Care Innovation Station Initiative?

The Care Innovation Station is a program formed by the Nursing Resource and Innovation Council in partnership with the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children’s National Health System.

The Care Innovation Station committee (consisting of the Nursing Innovation Council and a panel of business advisors) screen the ideas on a monthly basis to look for opportunities to bring innovative pediatric products and creative processes to our patients and their families.

What is the Scope?

All innovations to improve healthcare for children are in the scope. We are particularly interested in some specific areas like such as medical devices, apps, software, and process improvement.

Who Can Submit an Idea?

During the pilot rollout, the Care Innovation Station is open to anyone at Children’s National and our patients and their families. Anyone can pitch in with ideas for technological innovations and process improvement models.

Is there a Prize?

Depending on the number of submissions that lend themselves to future follow-ups, we plan to establish a prize competition. Please stay tuned. At Children’s National, we aim at including our staff, patients and families in the process of innovation to improve children’s health.

Examples from Nurse Innovators

Warming head wrap for babies

Boston Children’s Hospital
An operating room nurse figured out that the Mylar wraps that marathon runners use to warm up after races could be incorporated into a hat to warm babies after surgery. Her creation- a lightweight fabric and Mylar wrap- warms babies so they can be more readily removed from a bypass machine.

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WhatVax?

Boston Children’s Hospital
A major challenge for hospital employees is ordering proper quantities of vaccines. It is a complicated and time-consuming task that can also become costly when hospitals surpass government funding provided for such purposes. Two nurses from Boston Children’s Hospital created an app called WhatVax? to assist with the decision-making process after their concept won an award at a Hackathon hosted by the hospital.

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Remote Safety Checks (RNSafe)

Remote Safety Checks (RNSafe)
Before administering certain medications, nurses are required to run a test on both the patient and the medicine. This lengthy process inspired a group of nurses to devise RNSafe. This product is a telehealth-based method that can remotely complete the required checks using a tablet or smartphone equipped with a camera to transmit the information to another nurse who will then interpret and verify the data.

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Standardizing Interprofessional Patient Education Documentation

Boston Children's Hospital
Patient education documentation, the process of informing patients and family members of details regarding a procedure or medical condition, is far more complex than it sounds. Given the sheer number of clinicians that interact with a single patient, it can be difficult to ensure that this process is done sufficiently. A team that included nurses created a standardized method that successfully improved patient education altogether.

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DisCo

Boston Children's Hospital
Many healthcare providers worry about pediatric patients’ continued wellbeing following their discharge. To solve this issues, a team including a nurse developed an email-based Discharge Communication system to keep in touch with patients and their families. This proactive approach has helped reduce the incidence of unnecessary re-admission.

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Pedi-Neb

Elizabeth McGoogan, RN, PPN
Infants can be fairly uncooperative when it comes time for them to take their medicine. To address this issue, a nurse created the Pedi-Neb, an adaptable pacifier that features a port on its top so that aerosol medication can be delivered to infants via nebulizer.

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TLC UltraSplint

I.V. House
Due to the fact that pediatric patients have a tendency to fidget and pull at IV sites, nurses have to painstakingly create makeshift devices to cover the IVs. With this in mind, a nurse created a splint-like device meant to house IVs, thus preventing pediatric patients from removing them or altering their positioning.

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ColorSafe IV Lines

ColorSafe IV Lines
There are hundreds of thousands of injuries resulting from IV medication errors every year. Furthermore, the use of multiple IV lines in some patients can cause difficulty in the identification of each line and its corresponding medication. To solve this issue, two nurses created ColorSafe IV Lines, color-coded lines that ease the process line identification and prevent medication errors.

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TeddiTop

Texas Children's Hospital
Traditional methods to attach Holter monitors to children are identical to those used on adults, which oftentimes leads to the children manipulating the monitor and disrupting data collection. To address this issue, nurses from Texas Children’s Hospital created a new method to attach the Holter monitor to children. This attachment method utilizes a lifejacket-like device that protects both the monitor leads and the monitor from the child.

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Heart Hugs

Texas Children's Hospital
Children can develop pulmonary complications following cardiac surgery if they do not follow certain breathing techniques. With this in mind, nurses developed the Heart Hug, a heart shaped pillow that reminds children to breathe deeply and cough in order to prevent such postoperative issues.

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SurTube

Cnicus
Feeding tube placement is an inexact science. In fact, roughly 55% of feeding tubes have been misplaced, an issue that can cause prolonged hospital stays or even death in the neonatal population. To prevent this issue, a pediatric nurse developed a feeding tube that has a tip detectable by an external scanning device.

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Immediate Skin to Skin C-Section Drape

Clever Medical
Recent studies have reported significant evidence that skin to skin contact directly after delivery results in a multitude of benefits for both the infant and the mother; however, after cesarean delivery, infants are often whisked away before the mother and child have an opportunity to make contact. To solve this, a trio of nurses invented the Clever Medical Drape, a drape that has a sealable gap through which the infant can be handed to the mother after delivery.

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ClipVac

CareFusion
A hair clipper that shaves while simultaneously vacuuming loose hairs during pre-surgical procedures. The product has lessened the incidence of hospital-caused infections by reducing contaminants associated with hair.

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Goldilocks Valves

Goldilocks Valves
During CPR, administrators have no way of judging how much oxygen has been delivered to the lungs, which can lead to hyperventilation and death. In response, a nurse developed a specialized bag-valve-mask that monitors the amount of air that is delivered to the lungs.

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Bifurcated Venous Access Device (BVAD)

Jones Innovative Medical Solutions, Inc.
Despite already having an IV, hospital patients with diabetes and other conditions must still be pricked for blood draw. To solve this issue, a nurse invented an IV device that allows blood draw from administered IVs, thus preventing unnecessary pain on behalf of the patient.

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Integrated Health Care Communicator (iCOM)

Changi General Hospital
The language barrier can make caregiver-patient interactions nearly impossible. Nurses from Changi General Hospital in Singapore developed a device that translates phrases commonly used in hospital settings to other languages then synthesizes them with a given dialect. This device, the iCOM, vastly improves nurse to patient communication and helps eliminate the language barrier.

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Our Journey in the Hospital app

Phoenix Children’s Hospital
It can be a stressful experience for parents when their child is hospitalized. This stress can disrupt parents’ efforts to remember and understand treatments for their children once they leave the hospital. To combat these factors, nurses at the Phoenix Children’s Hospital created “Journey Boards” and digitized the concept into an educational app to help both the child and the parents understand their in-hospital experience and necessary steps once they leave.

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The Beata Clasp

Beata Clasp
Managing the wide assortment of IVs, oxygen, and other tubing that some patients require can be a time consuming task for nurses should those lines become tangled. The Beata clasp, a soft foam clasp that attaches to the hospital bedrail and organizes various lines, prevents entanglement and dislodging, thus easing caregiving.

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The Choice Cap

Tencar, Inc.
Previously, ostomy patients were limited to using collection devices that were outdated and restricted their freedom. The Choice cap, the newest development addressing ostomies, was designed by a nurse to be sealable and waterproof, thus preventing embarrassing leakage and odor. The device includes a Bluetooth system that notifies the owner via phone when it is full.

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Pediatric Easy Dosing System


When responding to pediatric-based emergencies, it is far too common that children receive improper dosage. This device simplifies the process of calculating dosage for pediatric patients by scaling syringes in terms of patient weight, thus eliminating the complication of calculating dosage in the moment.

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The NoNo Sleeve

NoNo Sleeve
Many type 2 diabetes patients have a surgically created vein connection in their arm (arterioveinous fistula) that facilitates dialysis; however, when this arm is accidently used for IVs or blood tests, it can result in potential health complications including increased risk of a blood clot. This sleeve wraps around the arm at risk and notifies nurses not to use it in such procedures.

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The BOA Constricting Band

North American Rescue
Crucial IVs oftentimes cannot be started in patients with low cardiac output. Recognizing low success rates in this area, a nurse developed the BOA Constricting Band in order to improve outcomes for such patients. This tourniquet device wraps around the arm and is then rolled downwards towards the hand in order to increase local blood pressure to the point that an IV can be started.

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The GoGown

GoGown
While most people think of hospitals as a place that cures sickness, it is not uncommon for patients to contract illnesses while staying in a hospital. In fact, the CDC estimates that about 1.7 million people contract an infection while in a U.S. hospital every year. To protect care providers and patients, a nurse developed the GoGown, a disposable isolation gown that prevents the spread of bacteria and other microbials, thus preventing hospital acquired illnesses (HAIs).

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